Oceanography: An Invitation To Marine Science, Loose-leaf Versin - 9th Edition - by Garrison, Tom S. - ISBN 9781305254282
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Oceanography: An Invitation To Marine S...
9th Edition
Garrison, Tom S.
Publisher: Brooks Cole
ISBN: 9781305254282

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Chapter 2.2 - The Age Of European DiscoveryChapter 2.3 - Voyaging Combined With Science To Advance Ocean StudiesChapter 2.4 - The First Scientific Expeditions Were Undertaken By GovernmentsChapter 2.5 - Contemporary Oceanography Makes Use Of Modern TechnologyChapter 3 - Earth Structure And Plate TectonicsChapter 3.1 - Pieces Of Earth’s Surface Look Like They Once Fit TogetherChapter 3.2 - Earth’s Interior Is LayeredChapter 3.3 - The Study Of Earthquakes Provides Evidence For LayeringChapter 3.4 - Earth’s Inner Structure Was Gradually RevealedChapter 3.5 - The New Understanding Of Earth Evolved SlowlyChapter 3.6 - Wegener’s Idea Is TransformedChapter 3.7 - The Breakthrough: From Seafloor Spreading To Plate TectonicsChapter 3.8 - Plates Interact At Plate BoundariesChapter 3.9 - A Summary Of Plate InteractionsChapter 3.10 - The Confirmation Of Plate TectonicsChapter 3.11 - Scientists Still Have Much To Learn About The Tectonic ProcessChapter 4 - Ocean BasinsChapter 4.1 - The Ocean Floor Is Mapped By BathymetryChapter 4.2 - Ocean-floor Topography Varies With LocationChapter 4.3 - Continental Margins May Be Active Or PassiveChapter 4.4 - The Topography Of Deep-ocean Basins Differs From That Of The Continental MarginChapter 4.5 - The Marine Environment Is Classified In Distinct ZonesChapter 4.6 - The Grand TourChapter 5 - SedimentsChapter 5.1 - Ocean Sediments Vary Greatly In AppearanceChapter 5.2 - Sediments Are Classified By Particle SizeChapter 5.3 - Sediments May Be Classified By SourceChapter 5.4 - Neritic Sediments Overlie Continental MarginsChapter 5.5 - Pelagic Sediments Vary In Composition And ThicknessChapter 5.6 - Researchers Have Mapped The Distribution Of Deep-ocean SedimentsChapter 5.7 - Geologists Use Specialized Tools To Study Ocean SedimentsChapter 5.8 - Sediments Are Historical Records Of Ocean ProcessesChapter 5.9 - Marine Sediments Are Economically ImportantChapter 6 - Water And Ocean StructureChapter 6.3 - The Water Molecule Is Held Together By Chemical BondsChapter 6.4 - Water Has Unusual Thermal CharacteristicsChapter 6.5 - Surface Water Moderates Global TemperatureChapter 6.6 - The Ocean Is Stratified By DensityChapter 6.7 - Refraction Can Bend The Paths Of Light And Sound Through WaterChapter 6.8 - Light Does Not Travel Far Through The OceanChapter 6.9 - Sound Travels Much Farther Than Light Through The OceanChapter 7 - Ocean ChemistryChapter 7.1 - Water Is A Powerful SolventChapter 7.2 - Seawater Consists Of Water And Dissolved SolidsChapter 7.3 - Gases Dissolve In SeawaterChapter 7.4 - The Ocean’s Acid–base Balance Varies With Dissolved Components And DepthChapter 8 - Circulation Of The AtmosphereChapter 8.1 - The Atmosphere And Ocean Interact With Each OtherChapter 8.2 - The Atmosphere Is Composed Mainly Of Nitrogen, Oxygen, And Water VaporChapter 8.3 - The Atmosphere Moves In Response To Uneven Solar Heating And Earth’s RotationChapter 8.4 - Atmospheric Circulation Generates Large-scale Surface Wind PatternsChapter 8.5 - Storms Are Variations In Large-scale Atmospheric CirculationChapter 8.6 - Katrina And SandyChapter 9 - Circulation Of The OceanChapter 9.1 - Mass Flow Of Ocean Water Is Driven By Wind And GravityChapter 9.2 - Surface Currents Are Driven By The WindsChapter 9.3 - Surface Currents Affect Weather And ClimateChapter 9.4 - Wind Can Cause Vertical Movement Of Ocean WaterChapter 9.5 - El Ni?o And La Ni?a Are Exceptions To Normal Wind And Current FlowChapter 9.6 - Thermohaline Circulation Affects All The Ocean’s WaterChapter 10 - WavesChapter 10.1 - Ocean Waves Move Energy Across The Sea SurfaceChapter 10.2 - Waves Are Classified By Their Physical CharacteristicsChapter 10.3 - The Behavior Of Waves Is Influenced By The Depth Of Water Through Which They Are MovingChapter 10.4 - Wind Blowing Over The Ocean Generates WavesChapter 10.5 - Interference Produces Irregular Wave MotionsChapter 10.6 - Deep-water Waves Change To Shallow-water Waves As They Approach ShoreChapter 10.7 - Internal Waves Can Form Between Ocean Layers Of Differing DensitiesChapter 10.8 - “tidal Waves” Are Probably Not What You ThinkChapter 10.9 - Storm Surges Form Beneath Strong Cyclonic StormsChapter 10.10 - Water Can Rock In A Confined BasinChapter 10.11 - Water Displacement Causes Tsunami And Seismic Sea WavesChapter 11 - TidesChapter 11.1 - Tides Are The Longest Of All Ocean WavesChapter 11.2 - Tides Are Forced Waves Formed By Gravity And InertiaChapter 11.3 - The Dynamic Theory Of Tides Adds Fluid Motion Dynamics To The Equilibrium TheoryChapter 11.4 - Most Tides Can Be Accurately PredictedChapter 11.5 - Tidal Patterns Can Affect Marine OrganismsChapter 11.6 - Power Can Be Extracted From Tidal MotionChapter 12 - CoastsChapter 12.1 - Coasts Are Shaped By Marine And Terrestrial ProcessesChapter 12.2 - Erosional Processes Dominate Some CoastsChapter 12.3 - Beaches Dominate Depositional CoastsChapter 12.4 - Larger-scale Features Accumulate On Depositional CoastsChapter 12.5 - Biological Activity Forms And Modifies CoastsChapter 12.6 - Freshwater Meets The Ocean In EstuariesChapter 12.7 - The Characteristics Of U.s. CoastsChapter 12.8 - Humans Interfere In Coastal ProcessesChapter 13 - Life In The OceanChapter 13.1 - Life On Earth Is Notable For Unity And Its DiversityChapter 13.2 - The Concept Of Evolution Helps Explain The Nature Of Life In The OceanChapter 13.3 - Rapid, Violent Change Causes Mass ExtinctionsChapter 13.4 - Oceanic Life Is Classified By Evolutionary HeritageChapter 13.5 - The Flow Of Energy Allows Living Things To Maintain Complex OrganizationChapter 13.6 - Living Organisms Are Built From A Few ElementsChapter 13.7 - Elements Cycle Between Living Organisms And Their SurroundingsChapter 13.8 - Environmental Factors Influence The Success Of Marine OrganismsChapter 14 - Primary ProducersChapter 14.1 - Primary Producers Synthesize Organic MaterialChapter 14.2 - Plankton Drift With Ocean CurrentsChapter 14.3 - Plankton Collection Methods Depend On The Organism’s SizeChapter 14.4 - PhytoplanktonChapter 14.5 - Lack Of Nutrients And Light Can Limit Primary ProductivityChapter 14.6 - Production Equals Consumption At The Compensation DepthChapter 14.7 - Phytoplankton Productivity Varies With Local ConditionsChapter 14.8 - Seaweeds And Marine Plants Are Diverse And Efficient Primary ProducersChapter 14.9 - Primary Productivity Also Occurs Deep In The Water Column, At Hydrothermal Vents, In Seabed Sediments, And In Solid RockChapter 15 - Marine AnimalsChapter 15.1 - Animals Evolved When Food And Oxygen Became PlentifulChapter 15.2 - Invertebrates Are The Most Successful And Abundant AnimalsChapter 15.3 - The Worm Phyla Are The Link To Advanced AnimalsChapter 15.4 - Advanced Invertebrates Have Complex Bodies And Internal SystemsChapter 15.5 - Construction Of Complex Chordate Bodies Begins On A Stiffening ScaffoldChapter 15.6 - Vertebrate Evolution Traces A Long And Diverse HistoryChapter 15.7 - Fishes Are Earth’s Most Abundant And Successful VertebratesChapter 15.8 - Fishes Are Successful Because Of Unique AdaptationsChapter 15.9 - Sea Turtles And Marine Crocodiles Are Ocean- Going ReptilesChapter 15.10 - Some Marine Birds Are The World’s Most Efficient FlyersChapter 15.11 - Marine Mammals Include The Largest Animals Ever To Have LivedChapter 16 - Marine CommunitiesChapter 16.1 - Marine Organisms Live In CommunitiesChapter 16.2 - Communities Consist Of Interacting Producers, Consumers, And DecomposersChapter 16.3 - Marine Communities Change As Time PassesChapter 16.4 - Examples Of Shoreline Marine CommunitiesChapter 16.5 - Examples Of Shallow Benthic And Open-ocean Marine CommunitiesChapter 16.6 - Examples Of Deep-sea Marine CommunitiesChapter 16.7 - Organisms In Communities Can Live In SymbiosisChapter 17 - Marine ResourcesChapter 17.1 - Marine Resources Are Subject To The Economic Laws Of Supply And DemandChapter 17.2 - Physical ResourcesChapter 17.3 - Renewable Sources Of Marine EnergyChapter 17.4 - Biological ResourcesChapter 17.5 - Nonextractive Resources Use The Ocean In PlaceChapter 17.6 - The Law Of The Sea Governs Marine Resource AllocationChapter 18 - The Ocean And The EnvironmentChapter 18.1 - An Introduction To Marine Environmental IssuesChapter 18.2 - Marine Pollutants May Be Natural Or Human GeneratedChapter 18.3 - Organisms Cannot Prosper If Their Habitats Are DisturbedChapter 18.4 - Marine Protected Areas Are RefugesChapter 18.5 - Earth’s Climate Is ChangingChapter 18.6 - What Can Be Done?

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