Physics for Scientists and Engineers: Foundations and Connections - 1st Edition - by Katz, Debora M. - ISBN 9781133939146
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Physics for Scientists and Engineers: F...
1st Edition
Katz, Debora M.
Publisher: Cengage Learning
ISBN: 9781133939146

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Chapter 3 - VectorsChapter 3.1 - Geometric Treatment Of VectorsChapter 3.2 - Cartesian Coordinate SystemsChapter 3.3 - Components Of A VectorChapter 4 - Two-and-three Dimensional MotionChapter 4.1 - What Is Multidimensional MotionChapter 4.2 - Motion Diagrams For Multidimensional MotionChapter 4.3 - Position And DisplacementChapter 4.5 - Special Case Of Projectile MotionChapter 4.6 - Special Case Of Uniform Circular MotionChapter 4.8 - Relative Motion In Two DimensionChapter 5 - Newton's Laws Of MotionChapter 5.2 - Newton's First LawChapter 5.3 - ForceChapter 5.4 - Inertial MassChapter 5.5 - Inertial Reference FramesChapter 5.6 - Newton's Second LawChapter 5.7 - Some Specific ForcesChapter 5.9 - Newton's Thirds LawChapter 6 - Applications Of Newton’s Laws Of MotionChapter 6.1 - Newton’s Laws In A Messy WorldChapter 6.3 - A Model For Static FrictionChapter 6.4 - Kinetic And Rolling FrictionChapter 6.5 - Drag And Terminal SpeedChapter 6.6 - Centripetal ForceChapter 7 - GravityChapter 7.1 - A Knowable UniverseChapter 7.2 - Kepler’s Laws Of Planetary MotionChapter 8 - Conservation Of EnergyChapter 8.1 - Another Approach To Newtonian MechanicsChapter 8.2 - EnergyChapter 8.3 - Gravitational Potential Energy Near The EarthChapter 9 - Energy In Nonisolated SystemsChapter 9.4 - Work Done By A Nonconstant ForceChapter 9.6 - Particles, Objects, And SystemsChapter 9.7 - Thermal EnergyChapter 9.9 - PowerChapter 10 - Systems Of Particles And Conservation Of MomentumChapter 10.1 - A Second Conservation PrincipleChapter 10.3 - Center Of Mass RevisitedChapter 10.5 - Conservation Of MomentumChapter 11 - CollisionsChapter 11.1 - What Is A Collision?Chapter 11.2 - ImpulseChapter 11.3 - Conservation During A CollisionChapter 11.5 - One-dimensional Elastic CollisionsChapter 11.6 - Two-dimensional CollisionsChapter 12 - Rotation I: Kinematics And DynamicsChapter 12.1 - Rotation Versus TranslationChapter 12.2 - Rotational KinematicsChapter 12.5 - TorqueChapter 13 - Rotation Ii: A Conservation ApproachChapter 13.1 - Conservation ApproachChapter 13.6 - Angular MomentumChapter 13.7 - Conservation Of Angular MomentumChapter 14 - Static Equilibrium, Elasticity, And FractureChapter 14.1 - What Is Static Equilibrium?Chapter 14.2 - Conditions For EquilibriumChapter 14.4 - Elasticity And FractureChapter 15 - FluidsChapter 15.1 - What Is A Fluid?Chapter 15.3 - PressureChapter 15.4 - Archimedes’s PrincipleChapter 16 - OscillationsChapter 16.1 - Picturing Harmonic MotionChapter 16.2 - Kinematic Equations Of Simple Harmonic MotionChapter 16.5 - Special Case: Object–spring OscillatorChapter 16.6 - Special Case: Simple PendulumChapter 17 - Traveling WavesChapter 17.2 - PulsesChapter 17.3 - Harmonic WavesChapter 17.5 - Sound: Special Case Of A Traveling Longitudinal WaveChapter 17.6 - Energy Transport In WavesChapter 18 - Superposition And Standing WavesChapter 18.1 - SuperpositionChapter 18.2 - ReflectionChapter 18.3 - InterferenceChapter 18.8 - BeatsChapter 19 - Temperature, Thermal Expansion And Gas LawsChapter 19.1 - Thermodynamics And TemperatureChapter 19.2 - Zeroth Law Of ThermodynamicsChapter 19.3 - Thermal ExpansionChapter 19.4 - Thermal StressChapter 19.5 - Gas LawsChapter 19.6 - Ideal Gas LawChapter 20 - Kinetic Theory Of GasesChapter 20.2 - Average And Root-mean-square QuantitiesChapter 20.3 - The Kinetic Theory Applied To Gas Temperature And PressureChapter 20.5 - Mean Free PathChapter 20.7 - Phase ChangesChapter 20.8 - EvaporationChapter 21 - Heat And The First Law Of ThermodynamicsChapter 21.2 - How Does Heat Fit Into The Conservation Of EnergyChapter 21.3 - The First Law Of ThermodynamicsChapter 21.4 - Heat Capacity And Specific HeatChapter 21.7 - Specific Thermodynamic ProcessesChapter 22 - Entropy And The Second Law Of ThermodynamicsChapter 22.2 - Heat EnginesChapter 22.4 - The Most Efficient EngineChapter 22.5 - Case Study: RefrigeratorsChapter 22.7 - Second Law Of Thermodynamics General StatementsChapter 22.9 - Entropy, Probability, And The Second LawChapter 23 - Electric ForcesChapter 23.2 - Models Of Electrical PhenomenaChapter 23.3 - A Qualitative Look At The Electrostatic ForceChapter 23.4 - Insulators And ConductorsChapter 24 - Electric FieldsChapter 24.2 - Special Case: Electric Field Of A Charged SphereChapter 24.3 - Electric Field LinesChapter 24.4 - Electric Field Of A Collection Of Charged ParticlesChapter 24.5 - Electric Field Of A Continuous Charge DistributionChapter 25 - Gauss’s LawChapter 25.1 - Qualitative Look At Gauss’s LawChapter 25.2 - FluxChapter 25.3 - Gauss’s LawChapter 25.4 - Special Case: Linear SymmetryChapter 25.7 - Special Case: ConductorsChapter 26 - Electric PotentialChapter 26.2 - Gravity AnalogyChapter 26.3 - Electric Potential EnergyChapter 26.4 - Electric PotentialChapter 26.5 - Special Case: Electric Potential Due To A Collection Of Charged ParticlesChapter 26.7 - Connection Between Electric Field (e) And Electric Potential (v)Chapter 26.9 - Graphing (e) And (v)Chapter 27 - Capacitors And BatteriesChapter 27.1 - The Leyden JarChapter 27.2 - CapacitorsChapter 27.3 - BatteriesChapter 27.4 - Capacitors In Parallel And SeriesChapter 27.7 - Energy Stored By A Capacitor With A DielectricChapter 28 - Current And ResistanceChapter 28.1 - Microscopic Model Of Charge FlowChapter 28.2 - CurrentChapter 28.3 - Current DensityChapter 28.5 - Resistance And ResistorsChapter 28.6 - Ohm’s LawChapter 28.7 - Power In A CircuitChapter 29 - Direct Current (dc) CircuitsChapter 29.1 - Measuring Potential Differences Between Two PointsChapter 29.2 - Kirchhoff’s Loop RuleChapter 29.4 - Kirchhoff’s Junction RuleChapter 29.5 - Resistors In ParallelChapter 30 - Magnetic Fields And ForcesChapter 30.2 - Revealing Magnetic FieldsChapter 30.3 - ?rsted’s DiscoveryChapter 30.4 - The Biot-savart LawChapter 30.8 - Magnetic Force On A Charged ParticleChapter 30.9 - Motion Of Charged Particles In A Magnetic FieldChapter 30.10 - Case Study: The Hall EffectChapter 30.12 - Force Between Two Long, Straight, Parallel WiresChapter 31 - Gauss’s Law For Magnetism And Ampère’s LawChapter 31.1 - Measuring The Magnetic FieldChapter 31.2 - Gauss’s Law For MagnetismChapter 31.3 - Ampère’s LawChapter 31.4 - Special Case: Linear SymmetryChapter 31.5 - Special Case: SolenoidsChapter 32 - Faraday’s Law Of InductionChapter 32.1 - Another Kind Of EmfChapter 32.2 - Faraday’s LawChapter 32.3 - Lenz’s LawChapter 32.4 - Lenz’s Law And Conservation Of EnergyChapter 32.5 - Case Study: Slide GeneratorChapter 32.6 - Case Study: Ac GeneratorsChapter 32.8 - Case Study: Power Transmission And TransformersChapter 33 - Inductors And Ac CircuitsChapter 33.1 - Inductors And InductanceChapter 33.2 - Back EmfChapter 33.3 - Special Case: Resistor–inductor (rl) CircuitChapter 33.4 - Energy Stored In A Magnetic FieldChapter 33.5 - Special Case: Inductor–capacitor (lc ) CircuitChapter 33.7 - Special Case: Ac Circuit With CapacitanceChapter 34 - Maxwell’s Equations And Electromagnetic WavesChapter 34.1 - Light: One Last Classical TopicChapter 34.2 - Generalized Form Of Faraday’s LawChapter 34.4 - Electromagnetic WavesChapter 34.5 - The Electromagnetic SpectrumChapter 34.6 - Energy And IntensityChapter 34.8 - PolarizationChapter 35 - Diffraction And InterferenceChapter 35.1 - Light Is A WaveChapter 35.2 - Sound Wave Interference RevisitedChapter 35.3 - Young’s Experiment: Position Of The FringesChapter 35.4 - Single-slit DiffractionChapter 35.6 - Single-slit Diffraction IntensityChapter 36 - Applications Of The Wave ModelChapter 36.2 - Circular Aperture DiffractionChapter 36.3 - Thin-film InterferenceChapter 36.4 - Diffraction GratingsChapter 36.5 - Dispersion And Resolving Power Of GratingsChapter 37 - Reflection And Images Formed By ReflectionChapter 37.2 - Law Of ReflectionChapter 37.3 - Images Formed By Plane MirrorsChapter 37.4 - Spherical MirrorsChapter 37.6 - Images Formed By Concave MirrorsChapter 38 - Refraction And Images Formed By RefractionChapter 38.1 - Law Of RefractionChapter 38.2 - Total Internal ReflectionChapter 38.3 - DispersionChapter 38.6 - Images Formed By Diverging LensesChapter 38.7 - Images Formed By Converging LensesChapter 38.9 - One-lens SystemsChapter 38.10 - Multiple-lens SystemsChapter 39 - RelativityChapter 39.1 - It’s In The Eye Of The ObserverChapter 39.2 - Special Case: Galilean RelativityChapter 39.7 - The Relativistic Doppler EffectChapter 39.10 - Newton’s Second Law And EnergyChapter 39.12 - Gravitational Lenses And Black Holes

Book Details

Master physics with Debora Katz's new, ground-breaking calculus-based physics program, PHYSICS FOR SCIENTISTS AND ENGINEERS: FOUNDATIONS AND CONNECTIONS. Dr. Katz's one-of-a-kind case study approach enables you to connect math and physics concepts in a modern, interactive way. By leveraging physics education research (PER) best practices and her extensive classroom experience, Debora Katz addresses the areas where students like you struggle the most: linking physics to the real world, overcoming common preconceptions, and connecting the concept being taught with the mathematical steps to follow. How Dr. Katz deals with these challenges--with case studies, student dialogues, and detailed two-column examples--distinguishes this text from any other and will assist you in going "beyond the quantitative" to master your physics course.

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Which of the following questions cannot be answered by applying the conservation of energy...When a spacecraft collides with a planet, it is not necessary for them to actually touch each other,...Often, we model the Moon as a particle in a circular orbit around the Earth. The same side of the...In the following four situations, you do positive work on asystem. In other words, energy is...What Is Static Equilibrium? Problems 13 are grouped. 1. C A ball is attached to a strong,...An alpha particle is the nucleus of a helium atom with two protons (mp = 1.673 1027 kg) and two...Case Study For each velocity listed, state the position and acceleration of the rubber disk in Crall...A dog swims from one end of a pool to the opposite end. Is the dogs motion described as a wave?...There are two waves on a string given by y1(x, t) = 2 cos (3t 10x) and y2(x, t) = 2 cos (3t + 10x)....Convert the following temperatures from the Fahrenheit scale to the Celsius and Kelvin scales: a....Use the kinetic theory to explain why a gas fills its container.Come up with a word or phrase to replace heat. Explain how your new term fits the concept of heat.If heat naturally flowed from cold objects to hotter ones, what would happen if you put a hot potato...What is the difference between a contact force and a field force? List all the forces presented in...The terms electrostatic force and electrostatic field may sound alike. To help keep them straight,...Which word or name has the same symmetry as the letters in the name ZAK? (Explain your answer.) a....What does it mean when a force is negative? What does it mean when the potential energy is negative?CASE STUDY Concept Exercise 27.1 (page 829), we ignored air resistance acting on the ring launched...You have two different metal conductors. Each has the same number of conduction electrons per unit...Study the symbols in Table 29.2. Then, without looking at the table, draw the symbols for these...A yoga teacher tells her students to imagine their hands are magnets pulling on each other. What are...Review Suppose you want to use a small, positively charged ball suspended by a light thread to map...A constant magnetic field of 0.275 T points through a circular loop of wire with radius 3.50 cm as...Two solenoids have the same number of turns per unit length, but one is short and wide and the other...What do we mean when we say that light is sometimes modeled as a particle and sometimes modeled as a...Light Is a Wave C As shown in Figure P35.1, spray paint can be used with a stencil to produce an...Many circular apertures are adjustable, such as the pupil of your eye or the shutter of a camera....A camera obscura is used to form an image of a distant object. If the object is 10.0 m away from the...The Sun appears at an angle of 53.0 above the horizontal as viewed by a dolphin swimming underwater....A simple pendulum surrounded by pegs is known as a Foucault pendulum (Fig. P39.1). Imagine watching...

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Physics For Scientists And Engineers: Foundations And Connections, Volume 2
1 Edition
ISBN: 9780534467661
Physics For Scientists And Engineers: Foundations And Connections
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ISBN: 9781305866737
Bundle: Physics For Scientists And Engineers: Foundations And Connections, Volume 1, Loose-leaf Version + Webassign Printed Access Card For Katz's ... And Connections, Single-term Courses
1 Edition
ISBN: 9781337759359
Bundle: Physics For Scientists And Engineers: Foundations And Connections, Volume 2, Loose-leaf Version + Webassign Printed Access Card For Katz's ... And Connections, Single-term Courses
1 Edition
ISBN: 9781337759250
Bundle: Physics For Scientists And Engineers: Foundations And Connections, Advance Edition, Volume 1, Loose-leaf Version + Webassign Printed Access ... And Connections, 1st Edition, Multi-term
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ISBN: 9781337141659
Bundle: Physics For Scientists And Engineers: Foundations And Connections, Advance Edition, Loose-leaf Version + Webassign Printed Access Card For ... And Connections, 1st Edition, Single-term
1 Edition
ISBN: 9781305775299
Bundle: Physics For Scientists And Engineers: Foundations And Connections, Advance Edition, Loose-leaf Version + Webassign Printed Access Card For ... And Connections, 1st Edition, Multi-term
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ISBN: 9781305775282
Physics for Scientists and Engineers: Foundations and Connections
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ISBN: 9780534466756
Physics for Scientists and Engineers: Foundations and Connections, Advance Edition, Volume 2
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ISBN: 9780534466862
Bundle: Physics for Scientists and Engineers: Foundations and Connections, Extended Version with Modern + WebAssign Printed Access Card for Katz's ... and Connections, 1st Edition, Multi-Term
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ISBN: 9781337759168
Physics For Scientists & Engineers, Volumes 1 & 2 (with Webassign Printed Access Card For Math & Sciences, Multi-term Courses)
1 Edition
ISBN: 9781305955974

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