Principles of Physics: A Calculus-Based Text - 5th Edition - by Raymond A. Serway, John W. Jewett - ISBN 9781133104261
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Principles of Physics: A Calculus-Based...
5th Edition
Raymond A. Serway, John W. Jewett
Publisher: Cengage Learning
ISBN: 9781133104261

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Chapter 2.5 - Motion DiagramsChapter 2.7 - Freely Falling ObjectsChapter 3 - Motion In Two DimensionsChapter 3.1 - The Position, Velocity, And Acceleration VectorsChapter 3.3 - Projectile MotionChapter 3.4 - Analysis Model: Particle In Uniform Circular MotionChapter 3.5 - Tangential And Radial AccelerationChapter 4 - The Laws Of MotionChapter 4.1 - The Concept Of ForceChapter 4.4 - Newton’s Second LawChapter 4.5 - The Gravitational Force And WeightChapter 4.6 - Newton’s Third LawChapter 4.7 - Analysis Models Using Newton’s Second LawChapter 5 - More Applications Of Newton’s LawsChapter 5.1 - Forces Of FrictionChapter 5.2 - Extending The Particle In Uniform Circular Motion ModelChapter 5.3 - Nonuniform Circular MotionChapter 5.4 - Motion In The Presence Of Velocity-dependent Resistive ForcesChapter 6 - Energy Of A SystemChapter 6.2 - Work Done By A Constant ForceChapter 6.3 - The Scalar Product Of Two VectorsChapter 6.4 - Work Done By A Varying ForceChapter 6.5 - Kinetic Energy And The Work–kinetic Energy TheoremChapter 6.6 - Potential Energy Of A SystemChapter 6.8 - Relationship Between Conservative Forces And Potential EnergyChapter 7 - Conservation Of EnergyChapter 7.1 - Analysis Model: Nonisolated System (energy)Chapter 7.2 - Analysis Model: Isolated System (energy)Chapter 7.4 - Situations Involving Kinetic FrictionChapter 8 - Momentum And CollisionsChapter 8.1 - Linear MomentumChapter 8.3 - Analysis Model: Nonisolated System (momentum)Chapter 8.4 - Collisions In One DimensionChapter 8.6 - The Center Of MassChapter 8.7 - Motion Of A System Of ParticlesChapter 9 - RelativityChapter 9.4 - Consequences Of Special RelativityChapter 9.5 - The Lorentz Transformation EquationsChapter 9.7 - Relativistic EnergyChapter 10 - Rotational MotionChapter 10.1 - Angular Position, Speed, And AccelerationChapter 10.2 - Analysis Model: Rigid Object Under Constant Angular AccelerationChapter 10.3 - Relations Between Rotational And Translational QuantitiesChapter 10.4 - Rotational Kinetic EnergyChapter 10.5 - Torque And The Vector ProductChapter 10.7 - Analysis Model: Rigid Object Under A Net TorqueChapter 10.9 - Analysis Model: Nonisolated System (angular Momentum)Chapter 10.10 - Analysis Model: Isolated System (angular Momentum)Chapter 10.12 - Rolling Motion Of Rigid ObjectsChapter 11 - Gravity, Planetary Orbits, And The Hydrogen AtomChapter 11.1 - Newton’s Law Of Universal Gravitation RevisitedChapter 11.3 - Kepler’s LawsChapter 11.4 - Energy Considerations In Planetary And Satellite MotionChapter 11.5 - Atomic Spectra And The Bohr Theory Of HydrogenChapter 12 - Oscillatory MotionChapter 12.1 - Motion Of An Object Attached To A SpringChapter 12.2 - Analysis Model: Particle In Simple Harmonic MotionChapter 12.4 - The Simple PendulumChapter 12.5 - The Physical PendulumChapter 13 - Mechanical WavesChapter 13.1 - Propagation Of A DisturbanceChapter 13.2 - Analysis Model: Traveling WaveChapter 13.3 - The Speed Of Transverse Waves On StringsChapter 13.5 - Rate Of Energy Transfer By Sinusoidal Waves On StringsChapter 13.7 - The Doppler Eff EctChapter 14 - Superposition And Standing WavesChapter 14.1 - Analysis Model: Waves In InterferenceChapter 14.2 - Standing WavesChapter 14.3 - Analysis Model: Waves Under Boundary ConditionsChapter 14.4 - Standing Waves In Air ColumnsChapter 14.5 - Beats: Interference In TimeChapter 15 - Fluid MechanicsChapter 15.1 - PressureChapter 15.2 - Variation Of Pressure With DepthChapter 15.4 - Buoyant Forces And Archimedes’s PrincipleChapter 15.6 - Streamlines And The Continuity Equation For FluidsChapter 15.7 - Bernoulli’s EquationChapter 16 - Temperature And The Kinetic Theory Of GasesChapter 16.2 - Thermometers And Temperature ScalesChapter 16.3 - Thermal Expansion Of Solids And LiquidsChapter 16.4 - Macroscopic Description Of An Ideal GasChapter 16.5 - The Kinetic Theory Of GasesChapter 16.6 - Distribution Of Molecular SpeedsChapter 17 - Energy In Thermal Processes: The First Law Of ThermodynamicsChapter 17.2 - Specific HeatChapter 17.3 - Latent HeatChapter 17.5 - The First Law Of ThermodynamicsChapter 17.6 - Some Applications Of The First Law Of ThermodynamicsChapter 17.7 - Molar Specifi C Heats Of Ideal GasesChapter 17.10 - Energy Transfer Mechanisms In Thermal ProcessesChapter 18 - Heat Engines, Entropy, And The Second Law Of ThermodynamicsChapter 18.1 - Heat Engines And The Second Law Of ThermodynamicsChapter 18.3 - The Carnot EngineChapter 18.4 - Heat Pumps And RefrigeratorsChapter 18.6 - EntropyChapter 18.7 - Entropy And The Second Law Of ThermodynamicsChapter 18.8 - Entropy Changes In Irreversible ProcessesChapter 19 - Electric Forces And Electric FieldsChapter 19.2 - Properties Of Electric ChargesChapter 19.3 - Insulators And ConductorsChapter 19.4 - Coulomb’s LawChapter 19.5 - Electric FieldsChapter 19.6 - Electric Field LinesChapter 19.9 - Gauss’s LawChapter 20 - Electric Potential And CapacitanceChapter 20.1 - Electric Potential And Potential Diff ErenceChapter 20.2 - Potential Diff Erence In A Uniform Electric FieldChapter 20.3 - Electric Potential And Potential Energy Due To Point ChargesChapter 20.4 - Obtaining The Value Of The Electric Field From The Electric PotentialChapter 20.7 - CapacitanceChapter 20.8 - Combinations Of CapacitorsChapter 20.9 - Energy Stored In A Charged CapacitorChapter 20.10 - Capacitors With DielectricsChapter 21 - Current And Direct Current CircuitsChapter 21.1 - Electric CurrentChapter 21.2 - Resistance And Ohm’s LawChapter 21.5 - Energy And Power In Electric CircuitsChapter 21.7 - Resistors In Series And ParallelChapter 21.9 - Rc CircuitsChapter 22 - Magnetic Forces And Magnetic FieldsChapter 22.2 - The Magnetic FieldChapter 22.3 - Motion Of A Charged Particle In A Uniform Magnetic FieldChapter 22.5 - Magnetic Force On A Current-carrying ConductorChapter 22.7 - The Biot–savart LawChapter 22.8 - The Magnetic Force Between Two Parallel ConductorsChapter 22.9 - Ampère’s LawChapter 22.10 - The Magnetic Field Of A SolenoidChapter 23 - Faraday’s Law And InductanceChapter 23.1 - Faraday’s Law Of InductionChapter 23.2 - Motional EmfChapter 23.3 - Lenz’s LawChapter 23.4 - Induced Emfs And Electric FieldsChapter 23.6 - Rl CircuitsChapter 23.7 - Energy Stored In A Magnetic FieldChapter 24 - Electromagnetic WavesChapter 24.1 - Displacement Current And The Generalized Form Of Ampère’s LawChapter 24.4 - Energy Carried By Electromagnetic WavesChapter 24.6 - The Spectrum Of Electromagnetic WavesChapter 24.7 - Polarization Of Light WavesChapter 25 - Reflection And Refraction Of LightChapter 25.3 - Analysis Model: Wave Under ReflectionChapter 25.4 - Analysis Model: Wave Under RefractionChapter 25.5 - Dispersion And PrismsChapter 25.7 - Total Internal Refl EctionChapter 26 - Image Formation By Mirrors And LensesChapter 26.1 - Images Formed By Flat MirrorsChapter 26.2 - Images Formed By Spherical MirrorsChapter 26.4 - Images Formed By Thin LensesChapter 26.5 - The EyeChapter 27 - Wave OpticsChapter 27.3 - Analysis Model: Waves In InterferenceChapter 27.5 - Interference In Thin FilmsChapter 27.6 - Diff Raction PatternsChapter 27.7 - Resolution Of Single-slit And Circular AperturesChapter 27.8 - The Diff Raction GratingChapter 28 - Quantum PhysicsChapter 28.1 - Blackbody Radiation And Planck’s TheoryChapter 28.2 - The Photoelectric Eff EctChapter 28.5 - The Wave Properties Of ParticlesChapter 28.6 - A New Model: The Quantum ParticleChapter 28.10 - A Particle In A BoxChapter 28.13 - Tunneling Through A Potential Energy BarrierChapter 29 - Atomic PhysicsChapter 29.2 - The Hydrogen Atom RevisitedChapter 29.4 - Physical Interpretation Of The Quantum NumbersChapter 29.5 - The Exclusion Principle And The Periodic TableChapter 29.6 - More On Atomic Spectra: Visible And X-rayChapter 30 - Nuclear PhysicsChapter 30.1 - Some Properties Of NucleiChapter 30.3 - RadioactivityChapter 30.4 - The Radioactive Decay ProcessesChapter 31 - Particle PhysicsChapter 31.2 - Positrons And Other AntiparticlesChapter 31.5 - Conservation LawsChapter 31.9 - Quarks

Book Details

PRINCIPLES OF PHYSICS features a concise approach to traditional topics, an early introduction to modern physics, and integration of physics education research pedagogy, as well as the inclusion of contemporary topics throughout the text. This revision of PRINCIPLES OF PHYSICS also contains a new worked example format, two new Contexts features, a revised problem set based on an analysis of problem usage data from WebAssign, and a thorough revision of every piece of line art in the text.

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A cyclist rides a bicycle with a wheel radius of 0.500 m across campus. A piece of plastic on the...Imagine that nitrogen and other atmospheric gases were more soluble in water so that the atmosphere...Which of the following statements is not true regarding a massspring system that moves with simple...Which of the following statements is not necessarily true regarding mechanical waves? (a) They are...A flute has a length of 58.0 cm. If the speed of sound in air is 343 m/s, what is the fundamental...A wooden block floats in water, and a steel object is attached to the bottom of the block by a...If the volume of an ideal gas is doubled while its temperature is quadrupled, does the pressure (a)...An amount of energy is added to ice, raising its temperature from 10C to 5C. A larger amount of...An engine does 15.0 kJ of work while exhausting 37.0 kJ to a cold reservoir. What is the efficiency...A point charge of 4.00 nC is located at (0, 1.00) m. What is the x component of the electric field...A parallel-plate capacitor is charged and then is disconnected from the battery. By what factor does...If the terminals of a battery with zero internal resistance are connected across two identical...A spatially uniform magnetic field cannot exert a magnetic force on a particle in which of the...Figure OQ23.1 is a graph of the magnetic flux through a certain coil of wire as a function of time...Which of the following statements are true regarding electromagnetic waves traveling through a...Carbon disulfide (n = 1.63) is poured into a container made of crown glass (n = 1.52). What is the...If a womans eyes are longer than normal, how is her vision affected and how can her vision be...Consider a wave passing through a single slit. What happens to the width of the central maximum of...Is each one of the following statements (a) through (e) true or false for an electron? (a) It is a...Consider the n = 3 energy level in a hydrogen atom. How many electrons can be placed in this level?...When 1532P decays to 1632S, which of the following particles is emitted? (a) a proton (b) an alpha...An isolated stationary muon decays into an electron, an electron antineutrino, and a muon neutrino....

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